Veterans and the artist talk about the Grumman Greenhouse

photoOn Mon, Dec 12, 2011 at 2:01 PM, wrote:

Dear Jordan,

I find your Art to be just that. You are a Deserving Artist of your creativity. My problem, yes mine is I use to fly your S2 Grumman Tracker “Greenhouse” in the Navy. Not the exact bird. You probably didn’t know this but we called it the Coffin.

It was difficult to bail out of. I’m currently under treatment of PTSD as I had witnessed my Commanding Officer Crash in NJ many years ago and all crewman where killed. Not your problem. But in Art form as it stands it does appear to be at it’s final moments just before impact. I don’t now if you are an American or not, but showing our Navy Airplane crashing as such could make a statement, but not in the Spirit I would choose. Appreciation of this piece is laking in the true spirit of Gardening wouldn’t you say, Such a peace full and full fulling way to find peace. I have a beautiful green house and I do find it to resolve many issues like this one

How much thought did it take to create this Art form?.

Ed Fitzpatrick , USN/USCGR, Retired

Dear Ed,

Thanks for getting in touch. The nature of the greenhouse aspect of the work dictates that it need stand on it’s nose, (somebody’s got to water the plants!) as does it’s installation site (between two tightly spaced buildings) – as such I was well aware that folks may interpret that as crashing. However, since I knew people would approach it as such, I wanted people to think more along the lines of- after a war or the apocalypse, when the remainders of war are in your backyard, what can you do with them? Something positive, like growing food in an airplane.

The navy blows up destroyers to create coral reefs for scuba divers. This was one of the things that I thought of also. Using something that contains human activity from the past to create something that still incorporates human activity in the future.

I hope you can visit it in real life, we have been working with many vets to gather info on the plane. When they see her in real life they are often moved, as they can see the care and time we took in restoring her by hand. She is whole and airtight and all cleaned up. She was formerly in ragged and ripped peices and destined for the scrapper.

Best,

Jordan Griska

p.s. here’s in installation video made by my friend Ryan Hinkel, so you can see where we built her and how we raised her up. The second video was provided to me by “Nails”, a pilot who flew these, and it shows our plane #100 landing at 1:08. And yes, we’re a bunch of kids who went to the oldest art school in America- Native Americans, imported Americans,  Armenians, and all sorts of things like Georgians. Our project manager was a firefighter for 7 years in Abington and ran with guys who flew these.

http://vimeo.com/32374072

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDZ9nN30fwM&feature=player_embedded#!

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One thought on “Veterans and the artist talk about the Grumman Greenhouse

  1. Have you been able to identify the Tracker by Bureau number (BuNo)? Was there any kind of data plate still on the airframe? If I know this number I can see if I can find a picture of the airplane in service.

    thx
    -an aviation enthusiast/pilot whose Dad was a Naval Aviator and flew S-2s among other things.

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